Doing feminist history: A symposium for emerging historians

Michelle Staff reflects on the recent Sydney Feminist History Group symposium for early career researchers and PhD candidates. In 2014, Joy Damousi posed the important question: “Does feminist history have a future?”. In her response, she highlighted the various challenges … Continue reading

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Gender Violence around the World: Reading List

To mark the launch of Alana Piper and Ana Stevenson’s edited collection, Gender Violence in Australia: Historical Perspectives (Monash University Publishing, 2019), we compiled a growing list of resources about gender violence around the world. Books Allen, Judith A. Sex and Secrets: Crimes Involving … Continue reading

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Who was Jane Walker? Remembering Women’s Activism

Sharon Crozier-De Rosa and Vera Mackie explore the complex interconnections between the history of women’s activism and its memorialisation in the twenty-first century. In April 2019, Time Magazine released its annual list of the ‘100 most influential people’. Alongside such leaders … Continue reading

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Sex smells: Olfaction, modernity and the regulation of women’s bodies

Alecia Simmonds explores how the way women’s bodies smell has been regulated across time. Is there anything more regulated than a woman’s body? Plucked, shaved, waxed, bleached, vajazzled, starved, toned, tanned, botoxed, implanted, pulled up, pushed out and underwired within … Continue reading

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Reflections on writing about education in the nineteenth-century British Empire

‘Who was colonial education for?’ Rebecca Swartz asks, in her new book about education across the British Empire, from South Africa to Western Australia. I have recently come to the end of what feels like a long journey, beginning with the … Continue reading

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A “poor puny thing”: Giuseppe Baretti and rhetorical violence against political women

Shane Greentree finds resonances between Giuseppe Baretti’s didactic text Easy Phraseology for the use of young ladies… (1775) and violent political rhetoric against contemporary women. The republican historian and political philosopher Catharine Macaulay (1731-1791) was among the most discussed women writers of her … Continue reading

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