Gender, Media, and Leadership: The Case of Julia Gillard

Political scientist Linda Trimble reflects on her new book, Ms. Prime Minister: Gender, Media, and Leadership (University of Toronto Press, 2017). I started writing Ms. Prime Minister: Gender, Media, and Leadership well before Julia Gillard won the top job in Australia. Intending … Continue reading

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Q&A with Melanie Oppenheimer: An AHA early career researchers series

The Australian Historical Association‘s network of Early Career Researchers continues its Q&A interview series with Australian historians. Here, we repost their interview with Melanie Oppenheimer. Melanie Oppenheimer Professor and Chair of History, Flinders University 1. Before you were an academic, you … Continue reading

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“The Cultural Underpinnings of Misogyny”: Mary Beard’s Women & Power

Lauren Robinson reflects upon classicist Mary Beard’s popular and provocative recent work, Women & Power: A Manifesto (2017). Mary Beard, Women & Power: A Manifesto. London: Profile Books, Ltd., 2017. RRP $19.99. ISBN: 9781788160605. Renowned British classicist Mary Beard’s latest offering, Women & Power: … Continue reading

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‘She looked wild’: Infanticide and insanity in nineteenth-century Victoria

Continuing our mental health series, Georgina Rychner explores insanity in trials for infanticide in late nineteenth-century Victoria. In the late nineteenth century, a woman charged with murder in Victoria was most likely to be charged with the killing of an … Continue reading

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“If I had wings”: Helplessness and anxiety among Australian soldiers’ mothers

To celebrate Anzac Day, Ellen Cresswell reflects on the uncertainty and anxieties soldiers’ mothers experienced for their sons during World War I. There is no word in English, French, or German for a mother who has lost her child. “Widow” … Continue reading

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Archive stories: Institutionalised women as lost lives?

As part of our mental health series, Catharine Coleborne considers the histories of institutionalised women and the relationship between researcher, historical subject and archive. In recent years historians have re-imagined the archive as what I call an ‘unstable’ site for … Continue reading

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