Author Archives: Managing Editor

‘She looked wild’: Infanticide and insanity in nineteenth-century Victoria

Continuing our mental health series, Georgina Rychner explores insanity in trials for infanticide in late nineteenth-century Victoria. In the late nineteenth century, a woman charged with murder in Victoria was most likely to be charged with the killing of an … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health | Comments Off on ‘She looked wild’: Infanticide and insanity in nineteenth-century Victoria

“If I had wings”: Helplessness and anxiety among Australian soldiers’ mothers

To celebrate Anzac Day, Ellen Cresswell reflects on the uncertainty and anxieties soldiers’ mothers experienced for their sons during World War I. There is no word in English, French, or German for a mother who has lost her child. “Widow” … Continue reading

Posted in Issue blogs | Comments Off on “If I had wings”: Helplessness and anxiety among Australian soldiers’ mothers

Archive stories: Institutionalised women as lost lives?

As part of our mental health series, Catharine Coleborne considers the histories of institutionalised women and the relationship between researcher, historical subject and archive. In recent years historians have re-imagined the archive as what I call an ‘unstable’ site for … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health | Comments Off on Archive stories: Institutionalised women as lost lives?

‘Relaxed and pleasant’: women undergoing leucotomy in Western Australia, 1947-1970

Continuing our mental health series, Philippa Martyr shares her research on the female experience of leucotomy in twentieth-century Western Australia. Psychosurgery – especially leucotomy (called lobotomy in the US) – is probably one of the most misunderstood elements in twentieth … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health | Comments Off on ‘Relaxed and pleasant’: women undergoing leucotomy in Western Australia, 1947-1970

Hearing women as mad in the asylum: past perceptions haunting the present

Dolly MacKinnon explores auditory constructions of female madness in the start of our series on the history of women and mental health. From the claim a woman sounds ‘hysterical’ to having their opinions met with the colloquialism ‘mad cow’, women … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health | Comments Off on Hearing women as mad in the asylum: past perceptions haunting the present

Being a white nurse in colonial Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia) before World War II

Clement Masakure reflects on the history of the segregated nursing profession in Southern Rhodesia (colonial Zimbabwe) during the 1930s and 1940s. The colonial hospitals of Central and Southern Africa are an important space to analyse, among other things, the experiences … Continue reading

Posted in Research blogs | Comments Off on Being a white nurse in colonial Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia) before World War II