Category Archives: Research blogs

Failing to lead by example: How Australian politics is facilitating a culture of violence against women

The Liberal Party of Australia’s gender problem, Ella Kuskoff argues, is more related to questions about violence against women than we might like to think. Search “women in politics” online and you will be confronted with a long list of … Continue reading

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Gender, Media, and Leadership: The Case of Julia Gillard

Political scientist Linda Trimble reflects on her new book, Ms. Prime Minister: Gender, Media, and Leadership (University of Toronto Press, 2017). I started writing Ms. Prime Minister: Gender, Media, and Leadership well before Julia Gillard won the top job in Australia. Intending … Continue reading

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Being a white nurse in colonial Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia) before World War II

Clement Masakure reflects on the history of the segregated nursing profession in Southern Rhodesia (colonial Zimbabwe) during the 1930s and 1940s. The colonial hospitals of Central and Southern Africa are an important space to analyse, among other things, the experiences … Continue reading

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Shame: A Transnational History of Women Policing Women

Sharon Crozier-de Rosa reflects on her latest book, Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash: Britain, Ireland and Australia, 1890-1920 (2018, Routledge). From the 1880s to the 1910s, novelist Marie Corelli reigned as ‘Queen of the Bestsellers’, far outselling any fellow authors … Continue reading

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‘Khaki-mad’: The gendered approach to venereal disease in World War Two

Danielle Broadhurst investigates how Victorian legislation targeted female sexuality as a key proponent of venereal disease in the Second World War. On the Australia home front during the Second World War, social interactions between servicemen from the United States and Australia … Continue reading

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